Category: JKA

Shiro Asano

Technique comes to some students quickly and to others slowly. But, with more training, everything grows. Students must ‘nichi nichi no keko’ – train harder, over and over again. Shiro Asano A no-nonsense karateka and a man of few words, hard training has been a way of life for Shiro Asano. He has always been …

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Yukichi Tabata

Nicknamed the ‘Happy Giant’ because of his easy-going demeanour, Yukichi Tabata stood over 6 ft, which was tall for a Japanese man. A member of the Japanese National Team for many years, he had a reputation for being a very tough fighter. Yukichi Tabata was born in Japan in 1943. After graduating from university in …

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Yuichi Sato

I have to admit, when I felt my strength starting to diminish, I hated it and it was also a motivation for me. I don’t want to show weakness. The difference today is that I am no longer looking for an immediate result. I look for technical progress, hip, mobility, shoulder placement, what location, what …

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Yoshikazu Sumi

Training with action and reaction, mostly good kihon too. Jiyu ippon kumite (semi freestyle) teaches good kumite. Also do not forget kata. We must practice everything equally, then kumite will improve for sure. Yoshikazu Sumi Known for his great spirit and sense of humour, Yoshikazu Sumi’s movement has been described as being strong and fluid. …

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Hitoshi Kasuya

It is important to practice kata in the correct way. First, learn the correct steps and movements. Second, learn to apply the correct rhythm to the kata. Third, and most important, is one’s mental control and concentration. Kata is a kind of meditation, to teach oneself to develop absolute self-control. The combination of timing, distance, …

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Avi Rokah

Our Karate is about more than efficient use, it is about self-mastery, or an endless journey toward mastery that we will never reach. We are never going to be perfect, but we can always get better. Avi Rokah Carrying on the Legacy of Karate as taught to him by Hidetaka Nishiyama, Avi Rokah has been …

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James Yabe

Teachers, young and old, are like all other students of the art. If they miss practice, their level and knowledge goes down. The one, and only way to keep up their knowledge, skill and physical condition is through lots of consistent workouts. James Yabe Among the first of Hidetaka Nishiyama’s students in the United States, …

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Manabu Murakami

Technically, maybe ten repetitions of a technique is enough. But Karate training is not just physical. We have spirit as well, and this must be trained too. Repetition training will make you strong physically, but will also make a strong spirit. Therefore, it is important. Manabu Murakami Alongside Tatsuya Naka, Nobuaki Kanazawa, and Tetsuji Nakamura, …

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Ken Wittstock

Whoever stops loses. Ken Wittstock Part of the first generation of Karate practitioners in South Africa, Ken Wittstock is considered one of the founding fathers of South African Karate. Kenneth Lawrence Wittstock was born on 21 August 1941, in Johannesburg, South Africa, to parents Alfred and Eliza Wittstock. He was the youngest of six children, …

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Yasuaki Nagatomo

To truly learn Karate, I believe students need to focus on three things: How to see, when to see, what to see. If they don’t know how to see, they can never learn. If they don’t know when to see, they miss the timing; they never can learn. If they know how to see and …

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