Category: Goju-ryu

Yosuke Yamashita

I think it would be a fundamental point for every practitioner to study the history of Karate in more depth. Yosuke Yamashita Known as the “Samurai of Puerto del Sol“, Yosuke Yamashita was a pioneer of Goju–Ryu Karate in Spain. He was at the forefront of the development of Goju–Ryu in Europe. His many students …

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Kenji Kurosaki

In my eyes, Kyodo is the purest of all martial arts, an archer is of all budokas the one who cares least about winning or losing. For him, only Budo exists. Kenji Kurosaki Known as a pioneer of kickboxing and Muay Thai in Japan, Kenji Kurosaki’s contribution to the history of Kyokushin Karate has been …

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Morio Higaonna

I think that people start learning Karate with different goals in their minds. However, whatever style they choose, I believe the most important factor is a good instructor… also one must never forget that Karate is not only about fighting. Morio Higaonna It could be argued that no one has done more to popularise Okinawan …

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Gary Spiers

An instructor must instill the attitude… “My life is in jeopardy – I must finish this man (or men) here in now!” Gary Spiers A larger-than-life character, Gary Spiers was one of the earliest exponents of practical applied Karate in the United Kingdom. He was a no-nonsense martial artist who used Karate as a tool …

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Anthony Mirakian

Unfortunately, much of the essence and spirit of traditional Karate has been lost. Since the advent of Karate championships, many practitioners are competing to win at any cost. This approach is not the traditional aim of Okinawan Goju–Ryu Karate-do. Anthony Mirakian A pioneer of Okinawan Goju-Ryu Karate in the United States, Anthony Mirakian was an …

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Damian Quintero

Karate has shaped me as a person. It has taught me certain values that I apply daily in my personal and professional life. Damian Quintero Nicknamed, ‘Kingtero‘, Damian has won more than 100 medals nationally and internationally. He has won medals at Olympic, World, and European levels. For over 20 years, he has been a …

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Eiichi Miyazato

Be mindful of your courtesy with humblenessTraining yourself considering physical strengthStudy and contrive seriouslyBe calm in mind and swift in actionTake care of yourselfLive a plain and simple lifeDo not be too proud of yourselfContinue training with patience and steadiness Eiichi Miyazato (Jundokan Dojo Kun) Known for his strong personality, Eiichi Miyazato was considered one …

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Leo Lipinski

I firmly believe that to learn to fight you must fight. So most of my basics are geared to fighting not the typical up and down movements you will see in most dojos. I use these for warm-up only and usually I dispense with this type of monotonous practice after about 15 minutes. Leo Lipinski …

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Anichi Miyagi

Largely known by many as the teacher of Morio Higaonna, Anichi Miyagi was one of Goju–Ryu founder, Chojun Miyagi’s last students. Dedicated to Chojun Miyagi, he tried to stay true to his master’s teachings. Anichi Miyagi was born on 9 February 1931, in Naha, Okinawa. He was the oldest of three boys. Between 1 April …

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Ernie Molyneux

I think where we tend to miss out, is that the instructors themselves should have their own students pushing them. Your objective as an instructor is to push your students to a higher level, that’s even better than you are. But you shouldn’t be complacent and think, ‘I don’t have to train’. You should make …

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